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12.03.18

How to Buy a Road Bike

Welcome to the beautiful world of road cycling. Road bikes can serve as a means of exercise, sports (bike race), and fun simultaneously. But first, you should understand what it takes to buy a bike.

Before going to the bicycle shop to choose your new favorite road bike, it is useful to know some of the details that will make the process of buying your bike more comfortable. Some things you should consider are:

Analyze Yourself

Consider how many miles you can register per week or year. And think about your tendencies in buying other things. For example, do you like high-tech gadgets, dig tricks, or are you satisfied with simpler designs? Do you continuously ask for the highest quality or are you more likely to look for reasonable quality and lower costs? This should give you guidance in the type of bike that fits your spending habits. Furthermore, it is useful to know how much you want to spend (do you need a new bike or a used bike), as it is a quick way to focus on the selection process of the proper road bike for you.

Where are you going to ride?

Start by trying to figure out what kind of bike you want, a bike racer, hybrid bike or a road bike. There are many types of bicycles and knowing what you will do with them will significantly reduce the search. How often are you going to take a walk in a day? How far? Will it remain on paved surfaces or will it explore natural surface roads?

If you will ride on the sidewalk or just for exercise, a road bike or fitness bike is a good option. A comfort bike or cruiser bike is the best choice for short and informal trips. If you want a bike mainly to ride to work, an urban bike might be the best. If you want a bike to go to work and exercise, and you think you can ride both on sidewalks and natural surface paths, a versatile gravel bike is probably the most suitable. If you travel entirely off the road, a sturdy mountain bike is the best option. Sometimes more than one bike category may be appropriate. Once you restrict things to some styles, you can focus on specific candidates.

Things to Avoid When You Want To Buy A Bike

Do not buy a bike that is not in line with what you want it for.

Do not buy a pure racing bike, and complain because it's not performing effectively on the sidewalk. Beware of any bike that needs significant changes to make it work for you: the exchange of components is expensive and large adjustment settings (such as adding a super-long rod) can completely change the character of the bike. Some adjustments are reasonable, but if you find a long list of things that you would like to change, compare to see if there is another bike that best meets your needs.

Don't Buy Without Reading Reviews

You may not understand how to fit or handle a bicycle you read up on it. If you’re not 100%, you can always rent a bike; some local bicycle retailers have demonstration bicycles that you can rent or borrow, and many bicycle manufacturers offer free demonstration days in parks and shops all year round. Talk to a seller to find out about your options.

Don't Forget To Buy Accessories.

Many new riders reserve a certain amount for a bicycle, but they completely forget the accessories they will need. At the very least, start with a helmet, bottle cage, bike lights, a quality shorts with suede putty, and a pump. Tire levers, replacement tubes, and a small pump or inflator should also be purchased.

Guidelines For Buying A Bicycle

Many new riders reserve a certain amount for a bicycle, but they completely forget the accessories they will need. At the very least, start with a helmet, bottle cage, bike lights, a quality shorts with suede putty, and a pump. Tire levers, replacement tubes, and a small pump or inflator should also be purchased.

  • Buy once. It is cheaper to get the frame, wheels, and components you want to upgrade initially, rather than adding on components down the road.
  • Proper fit is much more important than making a good deal.
  • Be careful if an agreement seems too good to be true. Manufacturers offer the highest possible value in every bicycle model. But they also want to sell things. Sometimes compromises are made on the specification of components or on the quality of the frame to obtain a more attractive price. If a bicycle you're interested in has parts or features that do not look like because of their cost, try to find out which corners have been cut, or if the bike is stolen (see a bike registration database).
  • Choose the features and components that best meet your needs and then find out how much the bike costs. This way, you will know if your performance expectations match your budget.
  • Get ready to spend a little more because, usually, you will need some essential accessories with a new bike, such as a bottle of water and a cage, a bicycle computer, a new helmet, etc.

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